The Great Raspberry Rebellion of 1851

When, I saw this week’s photo prompt from Madison Woods   http://madisonwoods.wordpress.com/  I  cried,Aww, raspberries,” in the same dismal tone of frustration as Alfalfa of Little Rascals fame.


But after twenty seconds of exhaustive research, I uncovered this tasty morsel of little-known history regarding the lowly raspberry.

The Great Raspberry Rebellion of 1851

In 1851, textile mill owner, Robert Knight, traveled to Rhode Island to seek the perfect symbol for this trade name, Fruit of the Loom.

A cornucopia of fruit auditioned for the underwear manufacturer. An apple and currants were hired immediately. A banana and peach were caught in an illicit affair and disqualified for immoral behavior, leaving only grapes and raspberries to battle for the remaining positions.


The raspberries rose up in defiance, only to be crushed by the purple and green grapes. Historians refer to this incident as The Raspberry Rebellion, or by its more common name, The Wrath of Grapes.
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19 thoughts on “The Great Raspberry Rebellion of 1851

  1. Dear Russell,I'm surprised you didn't work sour grapes into the mix. Ah, well, the limits imposed by 100 words, eh?You continue to amaze. How do you keep you dendrites flexible and your synapses snapping after all these years? Whatever it is your taking, disregard your doctor and double the dose. Captain's orders.Looking forward to more lunacy in the future.Aloha,DougP.S. Thank you for the kind words re Here and Now. 🙂 D.

  2. An important piece of anecdotal History! It needed to be mentioned. Undertrodden raspberries are so often (s)quashed. It is good to re-visit this unique uprising. If it hadn't been for the Fruit of the Loom, it may never have occurred. I'm not sure that they are always given the credit that they deserve. Further, the name Wrath of Grapes, which has now become the most common one for this Rebellion, tends to overshadow the heroism of the raspberries at this glorious moment in their History. Thank you, Russell, for reminding us once again of this terrible time and how lucky we are not to have known it. My story's on the list.

  3. I think I'd have liked History lessons more if you'd been on the book list. Another fine, educational piece (fine means delicious in my neck of the woods). 😀

  4. Right you are, Lady Marilyn. The ground was sticky that horrible day. Red streams poured down the hillside into the nearby creek, so much that the water turned pink. The next day, insects swarmed the battlefield and gorged themselves on the pulp of the courageous raspberries. The scent of soured fruit filled the air and carried for miles in the mid-day breeze.

  5. I was just out at a gathering today where the discussion wound round to how hard comedy is. So far I've laughed every time I've read your posts and I don't know how you do it, but I'm glad you do!

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